Remembering

I took this in 2 years ago, still remembering . . .

Chapel Hill War Memorial
This memorial was inaugurated as the town’s memorial, in sacred memory of the men of Dukinfield who served and fought for their country in the Great War. It was unveiled on July 30, 1922, by Sir John Wood Bart, M.P.

The structure is of renaissance design, and takes the form of a column, 14ft 6ins in height, placed on a foundation comprised of three tiers of solid steps, and surmounted by a cast bronze figure of a soldier, 7ft 6ins high, standing at ease in full fighting kit. The total height is 24ft.

The base is 6ft square with beautifully moulded plinths, the shaft of the column tapering to 3ft 3ins square with moulded caps and pedestal to receive the figure.

Each side of the column is ornamented with Laurel Wreaths, and on the front is carved the Dukinfield coat of arms in relief. On the front and back of the frieze are cut in solid bold letters: To our Noble Dead, and Men of Dukinfield.

The Cap, which is moulded and shaped to receive the figure is beautifully caped with festoons of laurel and supported by ribbons buttoned at the corners.

Fixed on the four sides of the column are cast bronze panels, 4ft by 2ft 6ins, bearing 460 names of the fallen in raised letters. After the Second World War a further panel, bearing 81 names, was added.

The monument is built entirely of windy way stone, quarried from near the cat and fiddle, Macclesfield. Messrs W. Hewitt and Sons, Crescent Road, Dukinfield carried out the work, under the supervision of Mr S. Hague, borough surveyor.

The Sculptor and designer of the model was Mr P.G Bentham RBS of London, and the cast bronze figure was executed by the Morris Art Foundry Company, of Clapham.

The weight of the monument is approximately 34 tons, the figure alone weighing just less than a ton.

The cost was defrayed by the public subscription, organised by an influential committee appointed by the public, with Mr W. Wield as honorary secretary. The memorial was offered, accepted, and vested in the Borough Council on the unveiling day.

The triangular plot of land around the memorial is laid out with stone curbs. These originally were surmounted with cast-iron ornamental pillars, but they were removed during the Second World War for salvage.

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